The Baby in the Plastic Bag

One October morning in 1991, a newborn baby boy was found inside a plastic bag in a churchyard in Oslo, Norway. The infant was on the brink of death. What occurred in the subsequent hours, weeks and years constitutes a thrilling drama and piece of narrative journalism…

Read 'The Baby in the Plastic Bag' in 9 partsExplanation by makerBack to the stories
 


Bernt Jakob Oksnes (1973) is one of Norway’s most awarded narrative journalists. His human interest longform stories and documentaries have gained a lot of attention and a massive reader engagement, both in Norway and internationally. One of his last projects, “The Baby in the Plastic Bag” won several international awards in 2017; the European Digital Media Awards, Lovie Awards and W3 Awards, and was shortlisted for the European Press Prize and the American Webby Awards. The series was also listed for the prestigious «100 Exceptional Works of Journalism» in 2017, published by The Atlantic. “The Baby in the Plastic Bag” is recommended by individuals and media organizations in 45 countries. A record breaking amount of readers subscribed to the Norwegian Dagbladet's digital edition, just to get to read the new episode some days before they could read it on their free-site platform. In 2011 Oksnes won “The Journalist of the Year in Norway”, for his story “The Invisible”, where he reconstructed the life of a man who was buried with no-one coming in his funeral – apart from Oksnes, the writer. His projects have also been adapted into TV. In 2016 he won New York Festival’s TV- and Film Award.

Why this story?

Bernt Jakob Oksnes managed to capture a large part of the Norwegian public for weeks with the story of a baby left for dead at a cemetery. The narrative is subdued and subtle, often taking a step back to reflect on the events. Oksnes spun the story out over nine episodes, using all the techniques of TV series, with cliffhangers and repetitions from different perspectives. His newspaper Dagbladet invested heavily in the online presentation, which generated many new subscribers. When the series was translated into English, the story of the baby who miraculously survived conquered the world.

Explanation by the maker

"Growing up, stories about abandoned babies made an impression on me. I have always gravitated toward unusual characters and stories. When I dug deeper, I found ten cases in Norway over the last thirty years. But one story differed markedly; there was something about its bizarre poetry: the churchyard, the plastic bag, the frost on the grass on the graveyard, the bloody receipt in the plastic bag, the spectacular reunion of mother and son. Here is a huge story, an epic tale of life, death and love." Read more

Explanation by makerBack to the stories

For me it is a story of two beliefs

The story of young people leaving Western Europe to fight for religious extremists and terror organizations has become a familiar theme in the past five years. Most media stories tend to follow the process of radicalization of men and women, but Christian Lerch chose a different path. He decided to zoom in on the personal and the background of a family. “I was more interested in telling a story about the how, rather than about the reasons why the two young men left their comfortable lives in a wealthy German family in Kassel.”

Joachim Gerhard has become the face of parents of German jihadists who leave home. Christian Lerch approached Gerhard after he read an interview in a small regional newspaper. At that moment Gerhard was already writing a book about his attempts to find his sons. Gerhard thinks the German government left him to fight this battle alone. They are not forthcoming with information about his sons and strongly advise him not to go to Syria. But Gerhard is so determined that he makes several trips to the Syrian-Turkish border. Then, he asks Lerch to come with him, as can be heard in this call:

Orig. Phone Joachim: Yes, Mr. Lerch.

Orig. Phone CL: Do you have a moment?

Orig. Phone Joachim: Now I do. I have a question, Mr. Lerch. Would you be willing to enter Syria with me?

Orig. Phone CL: Have you heard any more about your sons, then?

Orig. Phone Joachim: I’ve now heard, that they’re supposed to be in Raqqa.

The documentary “Papa, we’re in Syria” has no ending – which reflects the ceaseless and epic love of parents for their children. It’s been two years since the story was first broadcast. His sons renounced him, betrayed and tricked him, and he has not heard from them since spring 2015 and yet Joachim Gerhard continues the search for his sons and their remains.

Christian Lerch: “That’s why for me it is a story of two beliefs: the belief of the two sons in radical Islam, their aspiration to help suffering people. On the other hand the belief of a father in the righteousness of his two sons.”

This maker's storyBack to the stories

This maker's story

Nothing found.


Papa, we're in Syria

An ordinary German family is pulled apart when the two grown up sons convert to Islam, and run away to join IS in Syria. Father and sons keep contact through WhatsApp voice messages. These messages bring the story very close to the listener as the gap within the family becomes wider and wider. Eventually, father Gerhard travels to Syria to try to find his sons…

Listen to 'Papa we're in Syria' (English subtitles)Explanation by makerBack to the stories
 


Christian Lerch (1978) started as an independent radio producer after finishing his master of liberal arts, by working for an oral history project in New York, interviewing holocaust survivors. This project kindled Lerch’s interest in radio as a journalistic medium and as an intriguing storytelling tool. Working with audio allows a journalist to flexibly work in the field without a supporting team, that helps to create in best cases trust with the interviewees. On the other hand for listeners following a story through original audio recordings activates the fantasy, thus allows creating individual (audio) images. His work is committed to feature documentaries journalistic and investigative research approach combined with a cinematic background for the production and storytelling. Aside from a trilogy on the devastating effects of the global war on drugs, Lerch is focusing on political and culture stories. In 2017 his work “Papa wir sind in Syrien” was awarded with the Prix Europa for the best European radio documentary.

Why this story?

The Prix Europa Radio Documentary Jury 2017 recognized ‘‘Papa, We Are In Syria’ - Joachim Gerhard’s Search for Lost Sons and Holy Warriors’ as ‘a thrilling 21st century tale told through a treasure trove of audio messages. This documentary takes the listener inside the nucleus of a personal family tragedy set in the defining story of our generation.’

Many radio documentaries are driven by narration. ‘‘Papa, We Are In Syria’ - Joachim Gerhard’s Search for Lost Sons and Holy Warriors’ is mainly carried and structured through the WhatsApp voice recordings of a German father and his two sons. The young men left Germany to join IS in Northern Syria. The astonishing material that makes up this audio documentary puts the listeners right in the middle of an enthralling scene, it provides information while giving insight into rare private emotions.

Explanation by the maker

The story of young people leaving Western Europe to fight for religious extremists and terror organizations has become a familiar theme in the past five years. Most media stories tend to follow the process of radicalization of men and women, but Christian Lerch chose a different path. He decided to zoom in on the personal and the background of a family. “I was more interested in telling a story about the how, rather than about the reasons why the two young men left their comfortable lives in a wealthy German family in Kassel.” Read more

Explanation by makerBack to the stories

My decision was to turn this failure into an advantage

1.

It was a cold autumn evening in 2005 when a book made me cry for the first time. I was 17, sitting at a table in my hometown, Wroclaw, drinking mint tea and reading. The book which struck me so hard was Like Eating Stone by Wojciech Tochman, about an anthropologist who tries to find and recognize scattered human bones after the war in Bosnia. Tochman’s sentences are usually short and sharp as knives. Reading them, I realized that verbs have overwhelming advantage over adjectives. A verb tells a story.

(What I couldn’t have imagined at that time was that, nine years later, Tochman would become the publisher of my first nonfiction book. So I can say that my publisher made me cry before we even met.)

2.

“They told her that the donor was a white man. But he was dark-skinned in fact, and he had Asperger’s”.

This is what a Belgian weekly newspaper reported in February 2014. I studied Dutch at university and during my internship in Antwerp, I read this article online and that’s how it all began. They quoted one of the mothers saying that her children’s skin turned darker every month. The fertility clinic in Barendrecht, the Netherlands, was referred to as “the sperm mafia”.

The internet was aswarm with English translations – some more reliable, others less so – of this Flemish article. People copy-pasted it in various forums. In one forum I read that “a Dutch clinic accidentally inseminated 500 Dutch women with the semen of a mentally handicapped Surinamese man”.

I wrote down the names from the article and the TV documentary I found soon after.

I thought I wouldn’t be able to find the donor, the children, the mothers. But I was. I thought they would not be willing to talk to me about such private issues. But they did.

Before I travelled to the Netherlands, I looked once more at the photograph of the man – Donor S. Who was he? He looked too young. Or was it an old photograph?

Had someone taken advantage of him, manipulated him? Was it his decision, having grown up in an immigrant family, scorned by the Dutch, to attract attention in this way?

It could have been that. But it turned out to be something else entirely.

3.

The second time I cried because of a book was in late January of 2007, when I heard on television that Ryszard Kapuscinski passed away. I instantly opened one of his books, The Emperor and read out loud, its first lines, once again:

“It was a small dog, a Japanese breed. His name was Lulu. He was allowed to sleep in the Emperor’s great bed. During various ceremonies, he would run away from the Emperor’s lap and pee on dignitaries’ shoes. The august gentlemen were not allowed to flinch or make the slightest gesture when they felt their feet getting wet. I had to walk among the dignitaries and wipe the urine from their shoes with a satin cloth. This was my job for ten years.”

Opening lines tell the story, they are there to catch the reader’s attention. I realised that I was going to miss Kapuscinski and his opening lines. At that time he was my narrative hero. A few years later, after I read his controversial biography, he remained a hero, but he also became a man of flesh and blood. Men of flesh and blood sometimes make mistakes. They even fail, from time to time.

Speaking of failing, one of the greatest lessons I ever learnt about writing was to always turn failures into advantages.

I heard this piece of wisdom from another Polish nonfiction writer, Mariusz Szczygiel, who learnt it himself while writing a story about a Czech entrepreneur, founder of the Bata Shoes company, Tomáš Baťa. When, early in his shoe-making career, Baťa couldn’t afford to buy a lot of leather, he decided to make shoes out of canvas, which didn’t cost that much. The little amount of leather he spared was just enough to make soles. That’s how he invented his first bestseller – canvas shoes with leather soles. I’ve read the reportage about Bat’a in Szczygiel’s book ‘Gottland’, which to my mind remains one of the most notable pieces of Polish narrative journalism.

Since then, I always look for canvas shoes with leather soles in every failure I face.

4.

I knew that my book would be incomplete without an interview with doctor Jan Karbaat, the man behind the infamous fertility clinic in Barendrecht. I tried to visit him three times. The first and the second time he didn’t even open the door.

My decision was to turn this failure into an advantage.

First, even though I didn’t manage to meet him, I described those two attempts at a visit in the book. A woman who went there with me was one of the donor children conceived in the clinic. So, because we went together, I suddenly realized I had a good narrative reason to tell her whole story too. Later she became one of the protagonists of my book.

Second, my fellow colleague advised me to write a paper letter to Karbaat. It was a great way of expanding the storytelling, because I could ask him anything I wanted and then cite it in my book, even if he didn’t reply.

But that didn’t mean I gave up on meeting him in person.

Before my third attempt to see him, I stayed in the Netherlands, searched through the files in the libraries nearby. In the archives I found a lot of interesting details about the doctor and his past. It took me 11 days. I decided to somehow include this research fact in my story. That’s how I found some good first lines for that chapter:

‘My first encounter with Dr Karbaat lasted eleven days. This is how long I spent going through newspaper articles, special features and documents, trying to reconstruct his career.’

There was one more unexpected advantage of this failure. In one of the old articles, Karbaat himself wrote in detail about the history of his house and how it became a clinic. Finally I found all the verbs I needed to tell the story:

‘The doctor patched up the roof, installed new door frames and double glazed windows, repaired the angel figurines and put them up where they used to be. With the municipality’s permission, he installed an old black gate from the cemetery at the entrance to his property. A neighbour got annoyed. He was putting up his house up for sale and worried that with Karbaat’s cemetery gate looking so handsome, his own house might drop in value.’

And you know what?

The third time I tried, he opened the door. Soon after it turned out I remained one of the last journalists who interviewed him. Karbaat died a few months later, on the very day when I collected first copies of All the children of Louis from the printing house.

It was a brisk spring morning in 2017 when I first held my own book in my hands.

This maker's storyBack to the stories

This maker's story

Nothing found.


The Halfjes: All of Louis’s Children

Jaleesa recalls that when FIOM rang with news about a matching donor, her first thought was, “Oh, I found the man from India!”. But then she learned that the man who had turned up was entirely different.

In a group meeting, a FIOM staff member announced to Jaleesa and her half- siblings that their donor was half-Surinamese. They were stunned. It meant that they were all quarter-Surinamese. Amanda had never considered Suriname. Matthijs would have guessed India, especially after talking to Jaleesa, but Suriname had also crossed his mind.

Jaleesa: “I’d felt I was part Indian for twenty years. I have nothing against Suriname, but it makes a big difference, it’s another part of the world, different genes – a different identity, in fact. That said, whenever we come together we’re terribly noisy, it’s like in a chicken coop. We’re bubbling, full of energy, we get worked up, we shout. It’s hard to notice that when we’re not together. But I began to notice the ways in which we’re Surinamese. The Dutch are more poised.”

Download a sample from 'All of Louis's Children'Explanation by makerBack to the stories
 


Kamil Bałuk (1988) is a young but already highly praised Polish journalist whose texts have appeared in the most prestigious Polish dailies and magazines. Among topics he found attractive are: the secret life of Polish cleaning ladies in the Jewish district of Antwerp; how a typical Pole behaves in the sauna; what kind of dreams people from 10 different states of the USA have?

Why this story?

A Dutch fertility clinic, known as ‘the sperm mafia’, inseminated women with the semen of a mentally handicapped Surinamese man. This short news item in 2014 drew the attention of Polish author Kamil Baluk, who had been studying Dutch in Antwerp. He wrote a book on this affair in the span of two years, and was one of the last journalists that interviewed clinic director Jan Karbaat, who secretly offered his own sperm to his clients. Apart from clients of the controversial clinic, Baluk visited several children who were born out of that semen. He accurately describes the sometimes bizarre history of sperm donation in the Netherlands, including the religious debate (a serious question was whether christian sperm could be donated to non-christians), lack of rules and doctors that acted based on their own beliefs. The book is catchy and journalistic, with juicy dialogue and visual language. It describes the Dutch situation so well that in the end you are convinced Baluk is, in fact, a Dutch journalist in disguise.

Explanation by the maker

“They told her that the donor was a white man. But he was dark-skinned in fact, and he had Asperger’s”.

This is what a Belgian weekly newspaper reported in February 2014. I studied Dutch at university and during my internship in Antwerp, I read this article online and that’s how it all began. They quoted one of the mothers saying that her children’s skin turned darker every month. The fertility clinic in Barendrecht, the Netherlands, was referred to as “the sperm mafia”.

The internet was aswarm with English translations – some more reliable, others less so – of this Flemish article. People copy-pasted it in various forums. In one forum I read that “a Dutch clinic accidentally inseminated 500 Dutch women with the semen of a mentally handicapped Surinamese man”. Read more

Explanation by makerBack to the stories

Lulu Miller over de 'Creative Cliff'

Op onze conferentie in 2017 'Amplify your Story: Adding emotion to journalism' sprak Lulu Miller van NPR's Invisibilia over het gebruik van emotie en spontaniteit in radio tijdens haar sessie 'On the Creative Cliff'. Ze vertelt over de valkuilen en mogelijkheden van spontaniteit en emotie in radio. Hoe ze zelf de uit de journalistiek overstapte naar fictie en de weg terugvond naar radio in haar liefde voor het waargebeurde, menselijke verhaal.


Winnaar publieksprijs 2017: De Verdwijners

Wat waren de beste journalistieke verhalen van 2017 uit Nederland en Vlaanderen? Uit maar liefst 120 Vlaamse en Nederlandse journalistieke verhalen koos een redactie de tien beste, die hun thema en personages met literaire stijlmiddelen, originaliteit en emotie op bijzondere wijze tot leven wisten te brengen.

Op donderdagavond 8 maart werden de tien beste journalistieke verhalen in de categorieën lezen, luisteren, kijken en klikken in Pakhuis de Zwijger gepresenteerd. De makers lichtten toe hoe zij hun verhaal vormgaven en welke keuzes ze daarin hebben gemaakt. Ook vertelden de hoofdpersonen uit een aantal van de verhalen hoe het is om centraal te staan in een journalistieke productie.

Publieksprijs
Een publieksjury, bestaande uit vrienden van de Stichting Verhalende Journalistiek, koos uit de tien genomineerden de overall winnaar. Deze publieksprijs ging naar Maartje Duin, maker van de radiodocumentaire ‘De Verdwijners’, over de wens en mogelijkheid om je hele leven achter je te laten en spoorloos te verdwijnen. De jury was onder meer enthousiast over de goed gekozen personages en beeldende scènes. Het mysterieuze element van de verhalen komt ook in vorm en klank tot uiting. Het thema is, hoe  actueel ook, verrassend en origineel uitgewerkt.

De tien beste journalistieke verhalen van 2017 zijn vanaf nu, met toelichtingen van de makers en de redactie, zijn hier te lezen.

De tien meestervertellers van 2017 zijn:
- Joyce de Badts - Een noodlottig toeval (NTR/VPRO)
- Jeroen van Bergeijk - Overleven als Uberchauffeur (de Volkskrant)
- Henk Blanken & Nina Blanken - Als de tijd stilstaat (de Volkskrant)
- Maartje Duin - De Verdwijners (NTR/VPRO)
- Piet Hein van der Hoek - De Stille Beving (NTR 2Doc)
- Jorien van Nes - Defending Brother No. 2 (VPRO)
- Nirit Peled & Sara Kolster - A Temporary Contact
- Thomas Rueb - Hoe Laura H. terugkeerde uit het kalifaat (NRC Handelsblad)
- Freek Schravesande - Ria is weg (NRC Handelsblad)
- Laura Stek - De laatste dagen van Standing Rock (VPRO)

Foto: Ka Wing Falkena


Kent u het verlangen om te verdwijnen?

‘Ik wou dat ik er niet was’, wie heeft dit nooit verzucht? Het is een direct gevolg van de steeds complexer wordende samenleving, die zich via allerlei kanalen voortdurend aan ons opdringt. Tegelijk is het verlangen om te verdwijnen niet iets dat je snel met anderen deelt. Dat maakte het voor mij een interessant onderwerp.

Het idee voor De Verdwijners kreeg ik door het boek Playing Dead van de Amerikaanse journaliste Elizabeth Greenwood. Hierin onderzoekt zij de vraag of je je eigen dood in scène kunt zetten en een nieuw leven kunt beginnen. Bijvoorbeeld om onder schulden uit te komen. In de huidige tijd, waarin wij overal digitale sporen achterlaten, blijkt dat bijna onmogelijk.

Evenmin als Greenwood lukte het mij om mensen te spreken die écht verdwenen waren – nogal wiedes. Maar een Nederlandse vrouw die al jaren op een winderige berg in Turkije woonde, met haar ezel en twee honden als enig gezelschap, kwam er dicht bij in de buurt. Fascinerend vond ik ook het verhaal van twee broers wier vader van de ene op de andere dag met de noorderzon was vertrokken. Jaren later vonden ze hem terug aan de Spaanse kust, om erachter te komen dat hij niet aan zichzelf had kunnen ontsnappen. Tenslotte zocht ik naar een meer beschouwende verhaallijn, in de persoon van een kunstenaar die dit thema in zijn oeuvre had verwerkt. Ik las over Bas Jan Ader en andere verdwijnkunstenaars en kwam uiteindelijk bij Maarten Inghels terecht, de toenmalige stadsdichter van Antwerpen. Ik mocht hem vergezellen op een performance die hij The Invisible Route noemde. Daarin ging hij op zoek naar een route door de stad waarbij je onzichtbaar voor camera’s bleef.

De Verdwijners bestaat uit een proloog en drie door elkaar heen gevlochten interviews: een vrij sobere verhaalstructuur dus. Deze kwam echter via grote omwegen tot stand.

Voor de proloog ging ik de straat op met de vraag ‘Kent u het verlangen om te verdwijnen?’ De eerste man die ik aansprak, bij een metrostation in de Bijlmer, gaf de perfecte antwoorden – zó perfect, dat luisteraars achteraf vroegen of ik een acteur had ingehuurd. Verbluft door deze toevalstreffer, stelde ik nog tientallen mensen dezelfde vraag. Maar geen enkel antwoord kwam ook maar in de buurt van dat van die eerste man.

Verder ondervroeg ik privédetectives over opsporingsmethoden en het recht om te verdwijnen (dat zoiets bestaat, vond ik al zo mooi), sprak ik familieleden van langdurig vermisten en interviewde ik collega Linda Polman, die ooit in Haïti bij corrupte ambtenaren haar eigen overlijdensakte kocht. Geen van deze verhaallijnen haalde de eindmontage.

Vanwege de losse structuur en het onderzoekende karakter noem ik De Verdwijners een radio-essay. Ik vond het een uitdaging om een verhaal te maken zonder voice-over teksten, waarin de verhaallijnen vloeiend en associatief in elkaar overlopen. Zoiets vraagt wel wat van de luisteraar: je moet maar hopen dat die dezelfde gedachtesprongen maakt als jij. Gelukkig kon ik dat toetsen aan mijn fantastische collega’s Katharina Smets en Gerrit Kalsbeek, steun en toeverlaten tijdens de opnames en montage.

Naar het verhaal van deze makerTerug naar alle verhalen

Het verhaal bij deze maker

Nothing found.


De verdwijners

Illustratie: Claudie de Cleen

Een vader laat een brief op de keukentafel achter en verdwijnt, om jaren later op te duiken in Spanje. Een dichter dwaalt door de stad, op zoek naar plekken om onzichtbaar te zijn. Een Nederlandse vrouw woont al jaren alleen op een winderige berg in Turkije. Je oude leven achter je laten en spoorloos verdwijnen. Kan het nog?

 

 

 

Beluister het verhaalToelichting van de makerTerug naar alle verhalen
 


Maartje Duin (1975) begon als schrijvend journalist en maakte in 2008 de overstap naar radiomaken. Zij maakt sfeervolle, associatief gemonteerde radiodocumentaires, waarin zij grote maatschappelijke thema’s – eenzaamheid, dementie, gentrificatie (het opwaarderen van een woongebied waardoor de vastgoedprijzen stijgen) – terugbrengt tot de menselijke maat. Daarbij heeft zij een voorliefde voor buitenstaanders en einzelgängers.

Maartje’s werk wordt vooral uitgezonden door de VPRO bij RadioDoc (NPO Radio 1). Rondom haar projecten organiseert zij vaak evenementen en discussieavonden. Zij presenteert ook luisteravonden voor Grenzeloos Geluid en was in 2016 een van de curatoren van het Oorzaken festival voor verhalende audio. (Foto: John Melskens)

Waarom dit verhaal?

‘Verdwijnen’ is in deze tijd van gekoppelde systemen, bewakingscamera’s en sociale media nagenoeg onmogelijk geworden, zowel fysiek als virtueel. Dat maakt van De Verdwijners een relevante en actuele productie. Het programma belicht drie ‘verdwijnperspectieven’: dat van twee zoons die hun vader met de noorderzon zagen vertrekken, dat van een vrouw die zich vrijwillig uit de bewoonde wereld terugtrok, en dat van de stadsdichter van Antwerpen die probeert een wandeling buiten het zicht van bewakingscamera’s te maken. De drie verhalen zijn geraffineerd met elkaar verweven en vullen elkaar mooi aan. Ze kleuren het filosofische begrip ‘verdwijnen’ concreet in, terwijl ze ook het denken erover aanwakkeren. Zowel qua thematiek, gekozen perspectieven als vertelvorm is De Verdwijners een knappe en goed doordachte productie. Met sterke personages, mooie scènes, een duidelijke gelaagdheid én journalistieke meerwaarde.

Toelichting van de maker

‘Ik wou dat ik er niet was’, wie heeft dit nooit verzucht? Het is een direct gevolg van de steeds complexer wordende samenleving, die zich via allerlei kanalen voortdurend aan ons opdringt. Tegelijk is het verlangen om te verdwijnen niet iets dat je snel met anderen deelt. Dat maakte het voor mij een interessant onderwerp.

Het idee voor De Verdwijners kreeg ik door het boek Playing Dead van de Amerikaanse journaliste Elizabeth Greenwood. Hierin onderzoekt zij de vraag of je je eigen dood in scène kunt zetten en een nieuw leven kunt beginnen. Bijvoorbeeld om onder schulden uit te komen. In de huidige tijd, waarin wij overal digitale sporen achterlaten, blijkt dat bijna onmogelijk. Lees verder

Toelichting van de makerTerug naar alle verhalen

Een noodlottig toeval

Stel, je vindt liefdesbrieven van de opbloeiende liefde tussen je opa en oma. Een smoorverliefde boerenzoon op zijn meisje. Maar dan stuit je ook op brieven van een andere man, die in geen enkel opzicht lijkt op je opa. Geschreven in dezelfde tijd als die van je opa. Wat doe je dan? Joyce de Badts maakte er een radiodocumentaire van. Een familieverhaal over de kantelpunten in ons leven.

Beluister het verhaalToelichting van de makerTerug naar alle verhalen
 


Joyce de Badts is docent Nederlands voor anderstalige nieuwkomers. In het verleden werkte ze als freelance redacteur bij het dagblad De Standaard en schreef ze voor het online magazine Hard Hoofd. Deze documentaire is haar eerste uitgezonden radiostuk. (Foto: Siege Dehing)

Waarom dit verhaal?

Wanneer slaat een gelukkig leven om? Kun je dat moment herkennen? En kun je dan ook ingrijpen of een andere keuze maken?

 

Deze herkenbare maar ernstige (en ongemakkelijke) vragen onderzoekt Joyce de Badts in haar radiodocumentaire Een noodlottig toeval. Ze graaft daarbij in haar eigen familieverleden, een familieverleden dat niet gespaard is door het noodlot. Het is bewonderenswaardig hoe zij erin slaagt om daarbij de juiste toon te vinden. Hoewel de ene dramatische gebeurtenis na de andere zich voordoet, is het verhaal verre van melodramatisch of larmoyant.  aar ook niet koel of afstandelijk.

Daar zit de rake voiceover voor veel tussen, de verteller weet hier -letterlijk -een heel eigen stem te vinden: de typische details die jeugdherinneringen kleuren, de manier waarop ze zich probeert in te leven in de gedachtewereld van haar grootmoeder, of hoe ze wars van enige sensatie alle onheil beschrijft. Die lichtheid maakt net dat je als luisteraar extra betrokken raakt.

Zoals elk bij elk goed (familie)verhaal, wordt ook hier het particuliere overstegen. Het thema ‘noodlot versus toeval’ is natuurlijk bij uitstek universeel en van alle tijden, maar toch is dit verhaal ook een tijdsdocument. Hoe nog niet eens zo lang geleden over bepaalde gevoelige thema’s als psychisch lijden nauwelijks of niet gepraat werd, en hoe gebeurtenissen in sommige gevallen misschien minder onafwendbaar zijn dan ze lijken.

Toelichting van de maker

Wanneer slaat een gelukkig leven om? Kun je dat moment herkennen? En kun je dan ook ingrijpen of een andere keuze maken? Deze herkenbare maar ernstige (en ongemakkelijke) vragen onderzoekt Joyce de Badts in haar radiodocumentaire Een noodlottig toeval. Lees verder

Toelichting van de makerTerug naar alle verhalen